3.9.-8.11.2019 – Kino Regina

Jean Cocteau, (1889-1963), French poet, librettist, novelist, actor, film director, and painter. Jean Cocteau is a ubiquitous figure of French Modern Art. In a life time, he followed most of the trends of the French avant-garde and was incidental in creating a unique surrealist and symbolist aesthetic in his drawings and movies. With actor Jean Marais, they formed one of the most mythical couples of French Cinema. For the 130 anniversary of his birth, Kino Regina dedicates a whole cycle to his unique cinematical vision.

Read more: http://kinoregina.fi/teemat/jean-cocteau/


LES PARENTS TERRIBLES (1948)

When Michel, who’s 22, tells his parents he is in love, his mother Yvonne is distraught, believing she will lose his love (which is the center of her life), and his father Georges is distressed because it is Georges’ mistress, Madeleine, who his son loves. Yvonne and Georges financially and emotionally depend on Michel’s maiden aunt, Léo, who was once engaged to Georges but gave him up to her sister. Léo resolves to help them separate Michel and Madeleine, choreographs an elaborate meeting at Madeleine’s flat where Georges concocts a lie that Madeleine feels she must embrace, and the lovers part. Aunt Léo then has a change of heart and tries to put everything right.


L’AIGLE À DEUX TÊTES (1947)

On the 10th anniversary of the assassination of the king, his reclusive widow, the Queen, arrives to spend the night at the castle of Krantz. Stanislas, a young anarchist poet who seeks to assassinate her, enters her room, wounded; he looks exactly like the dead king, and the Queen shelters him instead of handing him over to the police. She sees him as the welcome embodiment of her own death, calling him Azrael (the angel of death). An ambiguous love develops between them, uniting them in a bid to outwit the machinations of the court politicians, represented by the Comte de Foëhn, the chief of police, and Édith de Berg, the Queen’s companion. In order to remain true to their ideals and to each other, the Queen and Stanislas have to play their parts in a bizarre private tragedy, which the world will never understand.


LA BELLE ET LA BÊTE (1946)

A beautiful young woman takes her father’s place as the prisoner of a mysterious beast, who wishes to marry her.


LE TESTAMENT D’ORPHÉE (1960)

Cocteau’s last movie.
The poet Jean Cocteau is lost in space-time. He has been in the 18th century and is now turning up at different moments in professor Langevin’s life. The professor has invented some bullets, which travel faster than light. With one of them he kills Cocteau, who is resurrected as his old self, but is still caught in the space between fantasy and reality.


ORPHÉE (1949)

Orphee is a poet who becomes obsessed with Death (the Princess). They fall in love. Orphee’s wife, Eurydice, is killed by the Princess’ henchmen and Orphee goes after her into the Underworld. Although they have become dangerously entangled, the Princess sends Orphee back out of the Underworld, to carry on his life with Eurydice


LE SANG D’UN POÈTE (1930) + LA VILLA SANTO-SOSPIR (1952)

Cocteau’s first movie was commissioned by French aristocrat Charles de Noailles.
A young artist draws a face at a canvas on his easel. Suddenly the mouth on the drawing comes into life and starts talking. The artist tries to wipe it away with his hand, but when he looks into the hand he finds the living mouth on his palm. He tries to wipe it off on the mouth of an unfinished statue of a young woman. The statue comes into life and tells him that the only way out of the studio is through the looking glass…